Discrimination / Stigma

Discrimination / Stigma


Information
Walk A Mile In Our Shoes (NZ) – The research reveals that mental health services need to take a family and whānau-centred approach in order to reduce discrimination both towards and within families and whanau of people diagnosed with mental illness.  The research shows that families and whānau feel discriminated against by service staff and often struggle without enough support.  Reported negative behaviours include not providing information, ignoring cultural and other worldviews, not consulting or including families and whānau and blaming or criticising parents.  Auckland RETHiNK Grant 2010 Application Form – Have a project that counters discrimination and stigma and wanting a grant to fund it?  Use this application form to apply.
Mental Illness Myths & Facts – Mental illnesses and addictions are very common.  They are also widely misunderstood.  People with mental illnesses and addictions are frequently stigmatised by others for a variety of reasons: they may think mental illness is an uncommon condition or that addictions are the user’s own fault.  The truth is, mental illness and addictions can happen to anybody.
Employers: When support Is Needed –  Regular work planning sessions, appraisals or informal chats about progress can all provide neutral and non-stigmatising opportunities to find out about any problems your employee may be having.  It is helpful to use open questions that allow the employee maximum opportunity to express concerns in his or her own way.
I Haven’t Told Them, They Haven’t Asked – The Employment Experiences of People With Experience of Mental Illness.
Aspects of Stigma – Stigma and discrimination towards people with schizophrenia and other mental illnesses, and even towards their families, is a huge problem.  But until we can define what we are dealing with when we talk of stigma and discrimination we may not be able to do anything very much.
An EmployersStory – At the suggestion that someone with an experience of mental illness would be less productive due to needing the occasional timeout or a little flexibility from their employers, Richard Johnson laughs.  “We could say that about any of the staff and they don’t all have a diagnosis of mental illness,” he says.
Discrimination: What you do makes a difference.  – Discrimination is one of the biggest barriers to recovery.  That is why stopping discrimination and championing respect, rights and equality for people with experience of mental illness is so important.  It is as important as providing the best therapies or treatment.
Employment: What you do makes a difference. – Work is an activity central to the lives and wellbeing of most of us.  Unfortunately, for people with experience of mental illness, enjoying the benefits of work can be undermined by stigma and discrimination.
Bonny’s Story – When the symptoms of depression began to show for Bonny Neems, she had a number of fears: being labelled with a mental illness, being treated differently – but high on her list of concerns was losing her job as an administrator at a car dealership.
Employer & Manager Knowledge of and Attitudes to Mental Health & Illness – In 2004 a national survey of public awareness and attitudes towards mental illness was undertaken as part of the Like Minds Like Mine campaign, which allowed for comparisons with a 1997 survey.  This report examines the data for employers and managers/supervisors compared with the total sample (the wider target group of 15 to 44 year olds).  As the total sample findings have been reported elsewhere, the focus in this report is on examining ways in which employer and manager/supervisor findings differ from the total sample.
The Power Of Contact – Contact, which encompasses all the conditions that have been identified to be most effective in countering stigma and discrimination, can be facilitated through the development and delivery of structured education programmes.  This approach has been taken by some groups, both internationally and in New Zealand, with positive results.
Stigma Free Work Places, What Can Employers Do? – Stigma free and mentally healthy work places don’t happen by accident.
Work Life Balance In NZ– A snapshot of employee and employer attitudes and experiences.
Like Minds Like Mine National Plan – Programme to Counter Stigma and Discrimination Associated with Mental Illness.

Links
Like Minds, Like Mine (NZ) – Like Minds, Like Mine is a public health funded project to reduce the stigma of mental illness and the discrimination that people with experience of mental illness face everyday in the community.  This website provides information and resources on the project, looks at who is involved and how you can contribute to creating a nation that values and includes people with mental illness.
Imaginebetter (NZ) – The promotion of the social value of people with a disability, older people and people with a mental illness in New Zealand society.  Support for people who are socially devalued and their families to exercise more control and authority over their lives and futures.  Support for service providers who are genuinely engaged with trying to find better ways to support the lives of people who are socially devalued.