Suicide

Suicide


Information
Suicidal Thoughts & Behaviours – First Aid Guidelines (AUS) – These guidelines are a general set of recommendations about how you can help someone who may be at risk of suicide. Each individual is unique and it is important to tailor your support to that person’s needs. These recommendations therefore may not be appropriate for every person who may be at risk of suicide. Also, the guidelines are designed to be suitable for providing first aid in developed English-speaking countries. They may not be suitable for other cultural groups or for countries with different health systems.
After A Suicide – A website that offers practical information and guidance if you have lost a loved one to suicide: a friend, a member of your family or whānau, a colleague at work or someone else you were close to.
Ministry Of Health – information about suicide and suicide prevention, facts, and Ministry publications.
Having Suicidal Thoughts and Finding A Way Back – Having suicidal thoughts is overwhelming. It can be hard to know what to do and how to cope. To help you or someone you know through this, we’ve launched a new resource called Having Suicidal Thoughts and Finding a Way Back.
Written by those who have lived through suicidal experiences, the resource provides practical ways to manage distressing thoughts, and offers advice about how to get help from whānau and health professionals.
You can order a free copy of Having Suicidal Thoughts and Finding a Way Back or download a copy from the Mental Health Foundation webstore. The Personal Safety Plan, which comes with every copy of Having Suicidal Thoughts and Finding a Way Back, is also available to order or download separately. You can also click here to download.

Links
EQUIP (NZ) – Equip is a non-profit trust associated with Windsor Park Baptist Church covering Central Auckland, North Shore and Rodney District. Equip provides a range of mental health services, including a Suicide Prevention Service which offers ongoing support, training and education to the families and caregivers of people who threaten or attempt suicide.
GROW (NZ) – GROW is a voluntary association of people who know they are inadequate or maladjusted to life (mentally, socially or spiritually), who earnestly desire to change and are helping one another to grow to personal maturity.  GROW meetings are typically formed by a group of 5 to 9 people who meet weekly for two hours followed by some refreshments.  They combine personal testimonies, reports on progress, group work on members’ problems and adult education about rebuilding lives.  Between meetings they keep in touch through friendly phone calls and organised socials.  There is no need for referral and participation is voluntary.  Meetings are confidential and anonymous – members know one another by first names only.  No fees are charged and a small donation to meet necessary expenses is voluntary.
Lifeline Aotearoa (NZ) – LifeLine aims to reduce personal stress through readily available counselling and provides 24 hour, 7 day a week free telephone counselling; Face-to-Face counselling and other services. Suicide Prevention Helpline: 0508 TAUTOKO ( 0508 828 865)
Mental Health Foundation of NZ – The Mental Health Foundation develops information resources to support people who are worried about their own suicide risk or the suicide risk of someone close to them.
Samaritans (NZ) – The first New Zealand centre was set up in Wellington in 1965. Wellington Samaritans has been operating ever since, typically now taking about 20,000 calls a year. Wellington, like the six other centres in New Zealand, is there for callers literally every day of the year, 24/7.
Youthline (NZ) – Youthline provides a free, confidential and non judgemental telephone counselling service as well as Face to Face and Family Therapy.

Videos

‘Why we choose suicide’: Mark Henick at TEDx Toronto – Mark Henick is a mental health advocate. Informed by his direct experience with this aspect of the health care system, Mark has authored commentaries on issues relating to mental health for major newspapers across Canada and the U.S. His undergraduate degree is in Psychology and Philosophy, with a graduate degree in Child Development. At 22, he served as the youngest President of a provincial Canadian Mental Health Association division in history. He is the youngest member of the board of directors for the Mental Health Commission of Canada.
SPINZ Warning Signs for Suicide – How to recognise some visible warning signs that indicate someone may be at immediate or imminent risk for attempting suicide. Visit Suicide Prevention Information New Zealand (SPINZ) here: www.spinz.org.nz
‘I had a black dog his name was depression.’ – At its worst, depression can be a frightening, debilitating condition. Millions of people around the world live with depression. Many of these individuals and their families are afraid to talk about their struggles, and don’t know where to turn for help. However, depression is largely preventable and treatable. Recognizing depression and seeking help is the first and most critical towards recovery.  In collaboration with WHO to mark World Mental Health Day, writer and illustrator Matthew Johnstone tells the story of overcoming the “black dog of depression”. Click here for more information on the book.
The Power of Empathy – What is the best way to ease someone’s pain and suffering? In this beautifully animated RSA Short, Dr Brené Brown reminds us that we can only create a genuine empathic connection if we are brave enough to really get in touch with our own fragilities.
Technology and Suicide Prevention – Videos showing examples of social media, mobile phones, video games and other digital technologies being used to create connection, treat depression and prevent suicide.
TAUTOKO – Web-whakaaro with Dr Monique Faleafa – Dr Monique Faleafa is a well-known Pacific health advocate, researcher and clinical psychologist. She is also CEO of Le Va and interim CEO for Pacific Inc. Ltd.

Information
Suicidal Thoughts & Behaviours – First Aid Guidelines (AUS) – These guidelines are a general set of recommendations about how you can help someone who may be at risk of suicide. Each individual is unique and it is important to tailor your support to that person’s needs. These recommendations therefore may not be appropriate for every person who may be at risk of suicide. Also, the guidelines are designed to be suitable for providing first aid in developed English-speaking countries. They may not be suitable for other cultural groups or for countries with different health systems.
Ministry Of Health – information about suicide and suicide prevention, facts, and Ministry publications.
Support Websites

Big White Wall – sometimes life can be tough, the Big White Wall website is set up to help you work through whatever is troubling you.  It is anonymous and offers a way for you to connect with others who are feeling the same.  There are many different  resources available as well as providing opportunity for you  to engage in a community of support to express what you are really feeling and talk to others, in groups or individually.  There are also trained Wall guides available 24/7 to make sure you’re OK.
The Lowdown – If you or someone you know is experiencing depression, The Lowdown is a good place to be.  Here you will find info on depression, advice on dealing with it.  You can hear from musicians, celebs and everyday people sharing their own personal experiences with depression.
SPINZ: Suicide Prevention Information New Zealand – Suicide Prevention Information New Zealand provides information on safe and effective suicide prevention activities. We aim to improve your understanding of suicide prevention and your capacity to help those around you.  We don’t provide counselling or direct support services.
‘Let’s talk about suicide’: Facebook Page – ‘Let’s Talk About Suicide’ is a page that welcomes all to talk about their thoughts when feeling suicidal or even after the loss of a friend or loved one.  This page has been set up in the memory of brother and best friend Jono Kelly who passed away on the 31/03/2014 by suicide. Jono unlike most men openly spoke about his depression however after he could never quite find the right help for himself. There are many great charities working towards the prevention of suicide however the aim and goal of ‘Let’s Talk About Suicide’ is to bring any body feeling suicidal or self-harming together we want to give you the opportunity to talk to others feeling the same way as you be it openly or private. As well as a meeting point for the families and friends of those that have been lost by suicide.
Preventing Suicide for Pasifica – Preventing suicide for pacifika – Le Va’s top 5 tactics for helping prevent Pasifika suicide based on research, evidence and best practice.
‘Reasons to Go on Living’: Inspirational Stories – Every story sent to the ‘Reasons to go on Living’ Project is unique.  The stories describe many different experiences and emotions.  Some are very brief, some lengthy.  Some describe many events, some focus on the author’s suicide attempt. The stories posted here describe themes and ideas that are common to many of the stories we have received.  We hope these stories will help you understand some of the difficulties, challenges and changes experienced by people who considered ending their life.  We hope you find them educational and inspirational.
‘Highest suicide rate not surprising’ Article TVNZ 2011 – An article from 2011 outlining findings on how young New Zealand women have the highest rate of suicide in the OECD.
The Ministry of Health Action Plan for Suicide Prevention 2013 – 2016 – ‘Every week, on average, 10 people die in New Zealand by suicide. Many more are treated in hospital after a suicide attempt, having seriously harmed themselves. Suicide is devastating for all those personally affected and a tragedy for our society as a whole. Suicide rates have fallen by almost 24 percent since the peak in 1998, but they are still far too high. Sadly, we have some of the highest youth suicide rates in the developed world, and suicide rates for Māori are 54 percent higher than for non-Maori.’
Connectedness and Suicide Prevention in Adolescents – ‘How Connectedness is Currently Used in Relation to Suicide prevention’: Janis Whitlock MPH, PhD1,2,*,Peter A. Wyman PhD3 and Sarah R. Moore MA2 Article first published online: 20 JAN 2014.
‘Silence on Suicide not helping’: Article, Stuff NZ 2014 – Article outlining what more needs to be done by media to help New Zealanders talk about the rising number of suicides on our shores.

Support Lines and Groups
Families and whanau can contact any branch of Supporting Families nationwide for support and advice if you are concerned about someone.

EQUIP (NZ) – Equip is a non-profit trust associated with Windsor Park Baptist Church covering Central Auckland, North Shore and Rodney District. Equip provides a range of mental health services, including a Suicide Prevention Service which offers ongoing support, training and education to the families and caregivers of people who threaten or attempt suicide.
Lifeline Aotearoa (NZ) – LifeLine aims to reduce personal stress through readily available counselling and provides 24 hour, 7 day a week free telephone counselling; Face-to-Face counselling and other services. Suicide Prevention Helpline: 0508 TAUTOKO ( 0508 828 865)
Samaritans (NZ) – The first New Zealand centre was set up in Wellington in 1965. Wellington Samaritans has been operating ever since, typically now taking about 20,000 calls a year. Wellington, like the six other centres in New Zealand, is there for callers literally every day of the year, 24/7.
Youthline (NZ) – Youthline provides a free, confidential and non judgemental telephone counselling service as well as Face to Face and Family Therapy.
Supporting Families Northland now facilitates an adult suicide bereavement programme called WAVES.  Our aim is to help people with the opportunity to participate in a psycho-educational program that offers an experience of healing and community by connecting them with other people who have been bereaved by suicide. The purpose of WAVES in this context is to help adults learn more about grief and suicide, find meaning in their experiences, learn to manage emotions, reduce stigmatization and feelings of isolation and assist them to move forward. WAVES is an eight week program that consists of one 2 hour session per week. For more information or to register please contact your Northland Branch.